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#17684 - 07/14/10 03:27 PM Registered Traplines
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3689
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
This is directed at GTH but any of our other Canadian friends feel free to speak up.

Just what are the responsibilities of the trapper once he has acquired a registered line? Good points,Bad points.

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#17685 - 07/16/10 07:55 AM Re: Registered Traplines
Hal Offline
Moderator

Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 10100
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
I'm curious about this too. Can't anyone respond? -- Hal
_________________________
Endeavor to persevere.

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#17686 - 07/16/10 10:50 AM Re: Registered Traplines
nlcc Offline
Member

Registered: 10/23/07
Posts: 41
Loc: mb
The Registered Trapline System
and the Lineholder


What is an "RTL"?
The Registered Trapline (RTL) System is a commercial furbearer harvest management system whereby a person, the "lineholder," is granted the exclusive opportunity to harvest furbearing animals in a certain area, the "RTL." The system ensures sustainable furbearer populations by controlling the number of trappers in that area and making the lineholder the steward of the resource. Some RTL sections are called "blocks," where no individual lines exist and all eligible community members trap within the block.

Why is it important?
By the 1940s,trapping was out of control in northern Manitoba and furbearing animal numbers, espeically beaver, had been badly depleted. Part of the reason was the large influx of new people into the north with the building of the rail line to Churchill.

More tragically, local people (mostly First Nations) who had been trapping on the land for generations saw their traditional livelihoods threatened. At the request of the communities, Manitoba created the RTL system to allow local people to continue trapping on their traditional lands and at the same time make them stewards of their traplines. From the original RTLs created around the communities of Thicket Portage and Pikwitonei, the system has grown to a total of 46 community-based "sections" each with a varying number of individual lines.

Why is it even more important today?
When an RTL section was created by the community/First Nations trappers themselves, it usually also represented the traditional lands used by a community and defined those boundaries legally for the first time. These boundaries now form the basis for many major land-use projects around those communities (such as the Northern Flood Agreement management areas and the Poplar- Nanowin Rivers Park Reserve).

RTL trappers themselves are often the best sources of natural history information (traditional knowledge), as they are on the land more often than are most other people. It comes at a time when this information is constantly needed to track not just furbearing animals, but big game and the health of habitats.

How can I get an RTL line?
Lines cannot be sold, inherited, or handed down. They are awarded through competitions held in co-operation between the local trapping organization and Manitoba Conservation. Decisions are made through a scoring process, whereby a varying number of points are given to applicants based, among other things, on:

•family relationship to the previous lineholder
•their recent fur harvest history with that trapline or one in the same section, as verified by royalities paid and sales receipts
•their residency in relationship to the trapline being allocated
The process maintains a balance by recognizing that local residents have preferential access to RTL lines, but also by being flexible in allowing trappers from other communities an opportunity to compete for a line.

What does it mean to be an RTL lineholder?
Allocation of an RTL line is a significant event. When you are a lineholder, you have the exclusive opportunity to:

•harvest the fur resource on that line for commercial fur harvesting purposes
•establish a cabin in most cases on your line for trapping purposes
•have a helper to assist you in your efforts
•manage a valuable natural resource
What are the lineholder's obligations?
Some RTL lines are in great demand, and it is unfair to others if a lineholder is not exercising the privilege that they have been given.

Lines can be re-allocated for the following reasons:

a.the lineholder has been totally inactive without just cause for two consecutive years
b.the lineholder notifies the department, in writing, that he/she intends to give up his/her trapping privileges
c.the lineholder fails to renew his/her RTL permit without just cause
d.the lineholder dies
Lineholders have responsibilities that include:

•using the resource that has been allocated
•ensuring that your actions do not jeopardize furbearer populations
•updating traps according to the latest certified humane standards
•upgrading your trapping techniques to maximize your pelt value
•voicing your opinions and concerns to your local organization and to Manitoba Conservation
•ensuring any improvements such as cabins have the proper permits
What kind of cabin can be built?
A lineholder can build a main cabin and a certain number of line cabins, depending upon the location and size of their line. All lineholders are bound by the regulations set out in The Wildlife Act and other acts. Permits are required for cabins and are issued only in the name of the lineholder.

Record keeping and the RTL
All trappers should keep annual records of their activity through the trapping season, including when and where sets are placed, the dates and locations of here animals were caught, and when improvements when done on the line.

Records are an important tool in trapline management. Trappers can assess the relative abundance of animals over the years and judge when to “leave” an area for a season. Your own records will verify your activity on a line should you be eligible for compensation for disaster or mitigation programs. Records will also confirm that
you are actually exercising the privilege of having a trapline.

When a trapper no longer holds an RTL line, permission for them to have the cabin ends and they have no legal right to keep it in place. Incoming lineholders are under no obligation to buy any improvements on the line,such as a cabin.As such,a trapping cabin should be built at low cost with the thought in mind that, if an incoming lineholder does not want to purchase it, the cabin would have to be removed.

The ability to erect a trapper cabin is a unique privilege afforded only to the lineholders. Use of a trapping cabin for purposes other than trapping, without prior approval, is not allowed (e.g., unauthorized outfitting).

How do I learn more about the RTL System?
Administration of the RTL System is set out through The Wildlife Act of Manitoba and its regulations and through the Furbearer Management Policy. Copies are available from any Manitoba Conservation office.The Policy sets out guidelines and procedures for all trapping activities in Manitoba.

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#17687 - 07/16/10 11:00 AM Re: Registered Traplines
nlcc Offline
Member

Registered: 10/23/07
Posts: 41
Loc: mb
couple things i thought I should mention is that If you holda RTL liscence in Manitoba , you cannot hold an open area liscence.

Every province will have a different set of rules regarding their RTLs

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#17688 - 07/16/10 12:16 PM Re: Registered Traplines
Wis Trapper Offline
Member

Registered: 10/03/08
Posts: 163
Loc: South West Wisconsin
Great post nlcc. It was very informative and I enjoyed reading it.

Brad

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#17689 - 07/17/10 11:55 AM Re: Registered Traplines
musher Offline


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 2147
Loc: Qc.
Our system was a little like that but it is now more simple. We can now trap on our registered lines as well as on "open" lands. We do need permission from the land owner for private access.

Lines are smaller here. Some, near urban centres are only 20 sq. km.. The largest are only about 150 sq. km..

I have access to three. One of 75 sq. km, a second of 60 sq. km. and a third of 90 sq. km.

The only obligation lease holders have is to trap the areas and pay their lease. The lease holders must catch a MINIMUM of 15 fur bearers of 5 different species annually. The lease is about $1.50 a sq. km. annually.

About 2/3 of Quebec is "beaver reserve." That means that ONLY natives can trap there.

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#17690 - 07/17/10 12:06 PM Re: Registered Traplines
Hal Offline
Moderator

Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 10100
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
How is "native" defined? -- Hal
_________________________
Endeavor to persevere.

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#17691 - 07/17/10 01:21 PM Re: Registered Traplines
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3689
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
Ok, So for your lease payment. You have exclusive trapping privlages on a certain area.

Does the province juggle around the #'s of a particular spp. you are required to take. For instance..It is the bottom of the Lynx cycle but beaver have had it good for several years and are experiencing a population increase. Will they direct trappers to increase the beaver take and or reduce the pressure on Lynx?

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#17692 - 07/17/10 02:49 PM Re: Registered Traplines
musher Offline


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 2147
Loc: Qc.
Native means of Indian descent. The land was already being used before Europeans got here! Beaver Reserves aren't just about trapping. I don't think that Natives are that big on trapping as we do it. They want to catch a beaver but they want the meat as much or more than the pelt.

Beaver Reserves are places where Natives live the traditional lifestyle. That means moose when you see it and spring goose hunts. Areas are controlled by Native families and shared from generation to generation. They cover HUGE amounts of territory.

If my memory is correct, 20% of the province catches 80% of the fur. That is the southern section of the province where non-native people trap.

The province used to force you to catch 75% of a beaver "quota" on your line. The gov't determined the quota. The trapper also had to provide how many active beaver huts there were on their line. If they were not within a certain % of the gov't helicopter obtained number they lost their line. This has been abolished. Helicopter rides are expensive!

The trapper now determines what he catches. As I wrote, the minimum is 15 of 5 different species. Red squirrels and weasels count, as do bears.

We do have a lynx quota which is part of the "15." Some areas have no quota. Mine went from zero to three depending on the year. It's been stalled at 2 for a few years. The number is quite low considering the amount of lynx around.

The goal is to have the land trapped and MANAGED. Camp construction rules are quite strict. The gov't does not want people getting a license to "trap" because they want a camp to hunt moose. It's a problem. Lots of guys hit 5/15 and say they are trappers.

But the new system has benefited me personally. A couple of years ago I could only trap on one line and on my own private property. Now I'm trapping on the same line, my wife's line, and my daughters plus crown land, plus private property as well as my own land. I've gone from running about 100 sq. km to maybe close to 300 sq. km.

I bought more traps! laugh

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#17693 - 07/18/10 10:07 AM Re: Registered Traplines
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3689
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
How much Indian makes you an Indian?

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