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#25768 - 01/09/18 06:06 AM Snaring Fish.
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
These are pictures from Sunday, 1/7/2018. I borrowed some of these from Billie Jo's facebook page. She's the only adult girl on the ice, and her 2 little girls.










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#25769 - 01/09/18 07:54 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3650
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
What kind of wire do you use Tim. Been a long time since I've snared suckers.If I remember correctly we used a small diameter "picture frame" wire (cable) with a simple loop. I think a 3/64 or 1/16 cable with a lock would work pretty well. Remember losing fish when you didn't keep constant pressure while getting them through the ice.

Made into patties they are very good eating

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#25771 - 01/09/18 09:57 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
Hal Offline
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Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 9910
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
I never did snare any, but I recall my grandfather talking about snaring suckers off a bridge when they made their spring spawning run in NW Ohio. I speared a number of them.
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#25772 - 01/09/18 10:00 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Just talked to Moe, he thinks it's 20 or 22 gauge. Soft copper or brass, single strand wire. Pretty much what you'd use to hang a picture frame. It's ok for suckers, but it won't hold a carp.

Guys were snaring carp down on the big river, very few carp up where we were.

I've thought about using small snare cable too, but I figure the first fish would get it all kinked up. You know how they go crazy, before you can get them above the ice.

Honestly, I think it's more fun to gig them from a boat.

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#25773 - 01/09/18 12:53 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3650
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
What couldn't be fun about making a drift chucking a spear at a fish in the spring time......... considerably warmer also

Snare cable... a good swivel just above the loop would help preserve the cable. You could make a bunch of sucker snares from a 100' roll.

The picture frame wire/cable I used was the braided kind, much stronger than copper or brass single strand. Catch a fish, straighten it out and go back to work.

Never tried Carp

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#25774 - 01/09/18 02:25 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: Ric]
Hal Offline
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Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 9910
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
Originally Posted By: Ric
a good swivel just above the loop would help preserve the cable.


Yes, but how would you keep the loop from twisting? Don't you have to keep the plane of the loop perpendicular to the sucker? Or am I missing something?
_________________________
Endeavor to persevere.

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#25775 - 01/09/18 03:06 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Here are a couple more pictures. The one is the headlines of this weeks local paper, top half, front page. And pics from another one of my facebook friends. Those are carp, and looks like a couple will go 20 pounds or better.






I agree that the braided type of picture wire would work best. One thing about some kind of snare cable, it would have a lot more resistance, but the other day there was almost no current flow. The river level is very low and it was down to around 5* F. the other morning. I think it warmed up to around 15* around noon, no wind, just a nice day to be out.

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#25776 - 01/09/18 03:27 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
musher Online   content


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 1979
Loc: Qc.
O.k. questions: a sucker isn't a carp? I thought they were the same. So ...you see a fish and then you try to snare it?

The fish are spawning? Now!? It sure isn't spring yet.

Looks like fun.

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#25777 - 01/09/18 04:16 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
No, they're not the same. In our local streams we have yellow, white and spotted suckers. Most folks like the yellow suckers the best, they have smaller scales. And then carp. A big yellow sucker might weigh 4 pounds. Here are some pics from the big river. There is a video, not sure if I can post it here or not? I'll try.






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#25778 - 01/09/18 04:21 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
https://www.facebook.com/DonnieRexrode/videos/10214775344117818/

I'll see what happens, maybe it'll go? You may need to be on facebook too?

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#25779 - 01/09/18 06:14 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
musher Online   content


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 1979
Loc: Qc.
Not what I thought at all. Noisy as heck and pretty crowded! Thanks for educating me.

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#25782 - 01/09/18 06:55 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
I agree, that is noisy. The guys and gals that I was with, we used wooden "stompers." Those guys in the video are using metal pipes, more noise above the ice than below.

My bud Moe has some stompers, they probably weigh 5 pounds, with a metal handle, and the only thing you hear is a thump. You just walk along, raise it up knee high, and let it slide out of your hands. Ka-Bong. Next step, you repeat. Ka-Bong. The fish can feel it I guess, and you just drive them.

The ice was clear where we went the 2nd time, we were shooing them toward the folks snaring like you would a flock of chickens. We could see the fish, they could see us.

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#25787 - 01/10/18 06:23 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Sorry, I didn't answer Brian's other questions. No, they're not spawning yet.

That video above is pretty much to the extreme. I think it was taken on January 1st, a vacation day for a lot of folks, school was out and nothing else to do.

If you'll notice in my pictures above, the best "system" I've ever been around for snaring, is to cut your hole in the ice and then cover it with an old car tire. The tire gives you a place to rest your elbows. Remember those square seat type of PFD's, they make a good knee rest, and it's handy to have a PFD, just in case.

We cut our holes with a chainsaw the other day. But what you do, you point your butt toward the direction where you expect the fish to come from. And you look back under yourself, watching for fish. Most times they will be near the bottom, and when you see one coming, you'll try to line up your snare loop and get it in front of the fish. When it's head gets inside the snare loop, you just lift up, depending on the depth of the water, it's a 2 or 3, maybe a 4 handed operation.

The other day, we had enough snare poles rigged up and ready, just drop that pole and grab another one, and back to watching. A lot of times, the fish will kick around and get out of the snare loop, then all you need to do is just straighten out the loop, ready for the next pass.

Thinking about it now, the best day I've ever had snaring, there were only 5 of us on the ice. It was a thick, dark ice. That hole was full of suckers, and they were moving at a snail's pace.

I'd still rather gig from a boat. It's more efficient.


Edited by redsnow (01/10/18 05:16 PM)
Edit Reason: Replaced T with H.

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#25788 - 01/10/18 06:41 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3650
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
Your correct Hal . Loop needs to be perpendicular to fish. Swivel might make things difficult. Water flow is usually pretty low during "snareing time" and we would work pools where current was slow.

See the guy's poking there heads in the holes in the newspaper photo. We used a small dark cover over our heads to block the light from above. Surprising how well you can see under water when you block the light from above

Like I said never did Carp. Can only imagine that a 20 pounder would be VERY interesting

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#25789 - 01/10/18 04:10 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Next time I'm up at Moe's house I'll get a picture of one of his "stompers." It's just like a short handled tamp. Sound does carry across the ice and underwater.

Talking about all of the noise in that video above, I knew a man that lived here, you can't mention snaring without Bud's name coming up, but I've watched him just grab a piece of driftwood, and drag it behind him. Twist it now and then in his hand, ka-bing ka-bong, screech. . . Heck, the pole he'd be dragging might be 40 feet long.

Bud snared a big carp years ago, and had it mounted. I forget how much it weighed?, but I know the folks that own the house today, if it's still up there I'll run up and get us a picture. As well as I remember, that fish would darn near fill up a bathtub!

Carp are a lot of fun to play with, on a gig, or in a snare, or on a rod and reel.

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#25792 - 01/11/18 05:47 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV


Just a picture of our ice, that's good ice.

We've never really talked about our snare loop, what we were using the other day was a loop somewhere around 6 inches in diameter. Between 6 and 8". Figure a big sucker would be about 3 inches in diameter, give or take. I'll get us a picture first chance, but we had our snare loop on bamboo poles.

A friend of mine was telling me one time they were out on clear ice, the fish were really wild and spooky. They weren't doing any good at all. He said that they went back to the house and got a big sheet of black plastic, and stretched it out across the ice, where they had their holes. From what he told me, they cleaned up on them after that. (I'll bet that would be slicker than hell, plastic on ice!) It seems that fish do kind of relax and settle down when they are under some kind of cover.

I was out one day and stopped at the bridge up at the county line, I just wanted to check on the ice. There was a little patch of slack water, on one end of the bridge, and a little pocket of deep water. The slack water was frozen over, right out to the current, there were 3 guys down there snaring.

I've never watched anyone snare like this before, but they were laying on their bellies, fishing around up under the ice. Standing on the bridge, I could see the fish milling around under the guys. What they were doing, if a fish was out of reach of one guy, he'd poke it or scare it a little bit, and run it over to his buddy. They had several fish on the ice. Pretty neat just watching.

Thinking about it now, I know of a small bridge hole, and it should have suckers in it. That's a spring fed stream, we've had some warm days, but calling for cold weather again. I'll bet nobody has messed with that little hole, never know, it might be full of suckers.

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#25798 - 01/12/18 06:59 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
musher Online   content


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 1979
Loc: Qc.
When we have ice we have snow on it. often we have snow before we have ice. I have rarely seen clear ice except on puddles.

With the rain we are now having, we have water running on the snow that is on the ice. The fish are safe!

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#25805 - 01/14/18 07:34 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Here's another ice picture. The sun was off hard to my left in this picture, if you follow along with the shadows on the bottom of the river, those are shadows of the ice cracks. That ice is a good 7 inches or better, the water was around 5 feet deep there.



We had a very dry fall, very dry winter here. Really, we've been dry since last spring. Our rivers were running low, we've had some cool weather, we were down in the teen's back in November. I remember I drained the water lines up at the Old Shack, the 2nd week of November.

We've had rain and a little bit of snow, then the sun pops out and it gets windy, and we're dry again.

But conditions were perfect for ice. The rivers were low, we had several clear, calm and cold nights, and the rivers froze quick. The lowest temp I've had here at the house was -1 F., that one trail cam picture I posted the other day was minus 4 F. Or -6 F.?

We've had some screwy weather. Last Sunday, it was 5*F. and we had good ice. I think it was Thursday evening/night we had a little bit of rain, around 1/4". Deed honest, Friday evening I had a high temp of 74* F. A man said the ice was coming off in chunks Friday. I drove across the big river yesterday morning, and could see an ice jam, about 1/4 mile downstream. Just a guess, I'd say it was piled up around 5 feet high.

I couldn't see downstream coming home, but upstream it looked like the river was muddy. I just had a glimpse of the river, but I didn't see any river ice.

From 74* Friday, it snowed 2 or 3 inches up in the mountains Saturday, I had 9* F this morning. Up to 11* F. now.

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#25807 - 01/14/18 11:17 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
just Offline
Initiate Member

Registered: 12/13/17
Posts: 4
Loc: Henry co Iowa
When I was a kid Dad told me they used to fish the creek across from their house.
He said they would snare the fish.
I thought he was kidding me. This is the first I have heard of snaring fish since then.
That's been around 60 years ago.
just

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#25811 - 01/16/18 06:36 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Around here folks would go out in the spring and gig suckers, when they were going up the creeks to spawn. Never did hear of anyone trying to snare them.

We're not all on the same page, as far as gigging fish. Above where I said that gigging is more efficient, it is, and I'm not talking about just gigging from a bridge or wade gigging. It works best from a boat.

I have a 12 foot aluminum, flat bottom boat, it's solid and very stable on the water. I have an underwater light that we'll mount on the front of the boat, fish gigs with 8 and 10 foot handles. The man gigging will stand up front, with the lights working, in clear water, he should be able to see a fish the size of a sucker, at least 15 feet on each side of the boat, and about the same up front.

You can cover a lot of ground/river bottom, each pass. I've never really gigged in the daytime, other than just farting around.

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#25812 - 01/16/18 02:00 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Here are a couple of my fish gigs.






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#25813 - 01/17/18 06:42 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Here are the boat lights, I think one is a 50 watt, and the new one is 75 watt. 12 volt.



Here are 2 gigging lights that my buddy Felix made years ago. That's a light bulb inside of a quart jar, with lead weights. You'd hang the light over the side of the boat, and hook it up to the battery.



For years and years we used a sealed beam headlight, handheld when we were gigging. You get so much reflection if the water is a little bit choppy, or gigging in deep water. These underwater lights are a big improvement! Plus you've got both hands free.

My brother made the 2 little lights above, they are brighter than anything on the market, as far as I know. Just one of those things, Dad has us out on the river gigging suckers, carp and eels since we've been kids, and we still love it!

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#25823 - 01/25/18 01:57 PM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Here's a picture of my buddy Moe, on the ice, that was January 2014. Those are yellow suckers, I'd guess they are around 3 pounds each, give or take.

Soon as the river gets clear, and we can get a night off, my brother and I are going to take the boat out. He's pretty smooth about gigging fish.



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#25828 - 02/03/18 11:53 AM Re: Snaring Fish. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1975
Loc: WV
Guys Iíll tell you this story from years ago. Dad and I were out one night gigging suckers and carp, just the 2 of us. It was this time of year and cold. Back at the time, we had our best sucker/carp gig mounted on a 12-foot ash handle. If anyone knows of where you can buy a good ash handle for under $100, Iíd like to have one! That handle was light, quick to move around, and strong too.

Dad and I always switched off from time to time, and took turns running the motor and gigging. Anyway, we were putting fish in the boat. After a while, after ramming the gig into the rocks, itíll get dull. And that makes it tough to get a good grip on a fish, unless you can pin it to the bottom. When youíre gigging carp, sometimes the prongs on the gig will spread apart. What happens, youíll knock off 2 or 3 fish scales from each side, and away it goes.

We were down on the big river that night, I remember exactly where we were, itís a pretty good sized hole of water for around here. Anyway, between the 2 of us, weíd knocked the fuzz off of 4 or 5 big carp. And we couldnít find them again. We searched up and downstream as far as we could make it with just an electric trolling motor.

It was just like they disappeared, we just couldnít find them. Anyway, we thought weíd make one more pass. We went up the creek, nothing. I remember it was my turn to gig, Dad was running the motor, we were just coasting downstream. Dad was only using the motor just enough to keep the boat square. The battery was getting weak, it was getting late and we were just about ready to call it a night.

Back at the time we were using a handheld light. It was a sealed-beam headlight, one of the rectangular type bulbs, and had it mounted inside an antifreeze jug, for a handle. We had the wires running through the jugís cap, with the headlight wired inside of the jug.

Anyway, I was standing on the front seat of the boat, sweeping the light back and forth, side to side looking for fish. The water was clear as a bell, standing on the seat, holding the light head high, I could see a fish the size of a carp probably 30 or 40 feet. In shallow water, maybe 50 feet.

We were almost back down to the truck, when I spotted them again. I told Dad something like: Whoa, there they are, take her hard right. Those carp were all clustered up in a little pocket of water, about the size of the average house, or a little bigger. All lined up, pointing in the same direction, spaced out 10 or 15 feet apart, about 2 dozen of them. Dad told me to try to get the ones that weíd crippled up first.

A small stream comes into the river there, itís a silt/muddy bottom, in that pocket. I went to work on the fish, after I gigged the first 4 or 5, the water was stirred up so bad it was hard to see the bottom. For whatever reason, those fish stayed in that little pocket. Long story short, we put somewhere around 300 pounds of fish in the boat in about a half hour. I donít remember if Dad and I switched off gigging during that little deal or not? Dad loved to gig, and he was very good at it too.

Thatís one nice thing about using a handheld light, whoever is gigging, just shine the light on the fish you want, whoever is running the motor will put you right on top of it. Honestly, itís about as much fun running the motor, tell me where you need to be and Iíll put you there.

I donít really have any good digital pictures of us carp gigging, not yet anyway. But, above we were talking about 20 pound carp. My brother and I have both gigged carp over 30 pounds, I know that Dad had also. As well as I remember, our biggest ones were around 34 pounds. Once you get up to 26 or 28 pounds, they are few and far between!

The ice has came off the river, from the first little cold spell, I had 8* F. this morning. The water should be crystal clear. Ideal conditions. Iíll check with my brother, we might be able to go out in a day or 2. Iíll try to get us some pictures.

Itís a whole different story about the ďCarp-hoonĒ. Itís like a harpoon, but I made a few for carp. Run back up and re-read the story above, about the carp clustering up, youíll understand the reasoning.

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