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#26454 - 01/08/19 04:07 PM Pykrete
FLSH ETR Online   content
Member

Registered: 12/29/04
Posts: 1011
Loc: Cudahy, Wisconsin,USA
Not many folks know about this stuff. It's a super strong, super long lasting ice. It's also bullet proof. Was designed during the last WW and was supposed to be used to line the hulls of ships to protect against torpedoes. It was not cost effective to produce the product and keep it in a constant state of froze, so was abandoned. We, however, can make it and use it in our coolers during the hot seasons. The formula is 14% saw dust BY WEIGHT, and 86% water BY WEIGHT. And the 'by weight' makes it difficult to concoct. After much experimenting, I've come up with the easiest recipe. Funnel about one pound of saw dust into a one gallon jug, and add the rest in water, aprox. seven pounds. Not quite to the exact percentages, but close enough. I have used saw dust in the past from my radial arm saw, but I think that stuff is really too fine. When I was in Escanaba for the Nationals last year, I scooped up a couple of buckets of 'saw dust' from the log mill they had working there. Bigger chunks that have soaked up the water more effectively. If you're game, give it a try. I'm sure you'll be surprised at the longevity of the stuff in the cooler when it's hot out.

Frank.
_________________________
"If you don't stand for something,
you will fall for anything."

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#26455 - 01/09/19 08:34 AM Re: Pykrete [Re: FLSH ETR]
Hal Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 9999
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
Thanks Frank.
_________________________
Endeavor to persevere.

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#26456 - 01/09/19 04:34 PM Re: Pykrete [Re: FLSH ETR]
musher Offline


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 2046
Loc: Qc.
Sounds like it is worth a try. Thanks.

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#26459 - 01/10/19 11:07 AM Re: Pykrete [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 2205
Loc: WV
Interesting. I'd never heard of Pykrete.

Wood, wood shavings and sawdust are very good insulation.

Back when we were working on the Old King's house, waterline, well project. We buried about 12 feet of the waterline with wood chips/sawdust. The waterline comes out of the hand-dug well, about 18 inches below ground level, goes out 12 feet or so, then elbows 90* up to the house.

A local man has a "shaving mill", he sells shavings to the local poultry farms. A combination of wood chips and sawdust. Similar to the wood chips you can buy to put in your dog's house.

We dumped a full-sized pickup load of chips in the trench, packed it down and covered it with dirt later. Down, 20 inches or better, it should never freeze. If it keeps cold in, it will keep cold out too. Plus, if we ever need to dig up the waterline, those chips and sawdust will be easy digging, easy to find the elbow. If it would happen to freeze, that's where it'll bust first.

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#26460 - 01/11/19 07:21 AM Re: Pykrete [Re: FLSH ETR]
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3674
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
You going to armor one of your canoes Brian? :-)

"Ice Houses" in Cleveland used saw dust / wood chips for insulation. They kept ice throughout the year. As the ice was harvested from the lake it was used between and around the raw slabs before processing

I know it was not unusual to find blocks of ice in July/August when moving "saw dust" at the mills.

We would cover water lines that needed attention with about a foot of cow/horse manure in the fall. Insulation and heat from decomposition kept those lines functioning through some very cold winters.

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#26461 - 01/11/19 08:13 AM Re: Pykrete [Re: FLSH ETR]
Hal Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 9999
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
I believe that was the custom at almost all ice houses. Worked well too.
_________________________
Endeavor to persevere.

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#26462 - 01/11/19 09:40 AM Re: Pykrete [Re: FLSH ETR]
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3674
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
I would assume so. One of my earliest memories is going to the one in Cleveland with Dad. He had worked as a "Ice Man" after the war and new the owner well. The large slabs of lake ice were cut to the proper size, cleaned and loaded for delivery. The local delivery wagons were still Horse drawn at that time.


Edited by Ric (01/11/19 09:41 AM)

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#26463 - 01/11/19 09:56 AM Re: Pykrete [Re: Ric]
FLSH ETR Online   content
Member

Registered: 12/29/04
Posts: 1011
Loc: Cudahy, Wisconsin,USA
We arrived on the job site one nasty hot summer morning to start a new house. We cut the iron bands on the pile of 2X10s and started carrying them to the foundation. We found the middle of the middle of the bunk to be frozen. Felt good throwing them frosty joists on our bare shoulders!

Frank.
_________________________
"If you don't stand for something,
you will fall for anything."

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#26465 - 01/12/19 06:49 PM Re: Pykrete [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 2205
Loc: WV
Ric, that's a very interesting memory of you and your Dad. Very nice!

I forget the year, it would have been in the early 80's, we had a colder than average winter. The river ice got over a foot thick. Down at the train bridge, about 5 miles below town, there was an ice jam. The water backed up, and some of those slabs of ice floated out across the pasture upstream. Out, 200 yards from the river. Slabs of ice big enough to park all 4 wheels of your truck on.

Laying in that pasture, in the sun and wind, even with the river grit on top, those slabs of ice lasted for weeks and weeks.

I can imagine how long they would have lasted, if they'd been protected from the wind, and insulated a little bit.

Honestly, that's about the thickest river ice that I've ever seen. That sure would have been interesting to see that ice jam break loose, it took a lot of timber down the creek with it. I'm talking about the South Branch of the Potomac River.

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#26466 - 01/13/19 06:02 AM Re: Pykrete [Re: FLSH ETR]
musher Offline


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 2046
Loc: Qc.
I want my canoes lighter not heavier, Ric!

A road killed raccoon seems to be a good insulator, too. There is snow under them for a long time. The same is true for dirt. Black snow seems to take forever to melt.


Edited by musher (01/13/19 06:04 AM)

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