Please observe our rules: No profanity. No flaming. No commercial messages. No personal messages please.

Trap Line Photo
 
Trap Line Home   Trap Line Forum   Trap Line Help   Trap Line Photo   Old Hollow Blog   Archives
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#28640 - 02/20/23 06:02 PM Snawwwwsages
FLSH ETR Offline
Member

Registered: 12/29/04
Posts: 1202
Loc: Cudahy, Wisconsin,USA
Found some pork on sale so decided to put it to good use. Gathered many volunteers from my family and created 40lbs of fresh Hungarian style sausage. We named the day, 'ground hog day'! A fun time was had by all, and of course our efforts turned out great!


_________________________
"You're never too old to learn something stupid."

Top
#28641 - 02/21/23 11:41 AM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
musher Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 2407
Loc: Qc.
Good times! Wifey and I made goose sausages last week. They are pretty good.

Top
#28642 - 02/22/23 01:25 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
I agree, looks like a great experience. It's hard to tell from the pics, but it looks like the young man in the gray shirt, I'd guess he's in his teens? Spending time with your family is something that you can't put a price on.

Forty pounds of sausage, split between 10 people, it won't be long before you get to do it again!

I think that is a vaccum sealer, I've been thinking about getting one. Seems like I lose about half of the stuff I put in my freezer. It sets there and gets crammed in the back and covered up, and then it's dog food.

Not positive, but that also looks like a real sponge in the bottom picture.

Top
#28643 - 02/22/23 07:46 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: redsnow]
FLSH ETR Offline
Member

Registered: 12/29/04
Posts: 1202
Loc: Cudahy, Wisconsin,USA
Good eye Tim! That sponge was my dads. Used it for washing his car. I think it used to be bigger. And yup, young Koty will be 18 this coming May. Already has enough credits so he doesn't have to attend school. But he'll walk across the stage with his fellow graduating students this coming spring. He's working a full time and a part time job. Bought his first car before he had his drivers license. Needed a car to get to work, as he couldn't wait around for the school bus. A real go getter. NASA car fan. Back when he was 8 or 9, he could already name all the drivers, their car numbers, points earned, and their standings in the ranks. And yes, that vacuum sealer does a great job. Sometimes buying the party or family size meat products saves money. I break them up into meal size servings and shrink wrap them. It's all about that evil dollar!! smile
_________________________
"You're never too old to learn something stupid."

Top
#28644 - 02/23/23 11:57 AM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
musher Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 2407
Loc: Qc.
We have a small vacuum sealer. It does a "meh" job. We don't use it anymore. I was recently thinking of getting a good one. They are $500. They also take a lot of room. Where do you put the dang thing.

Top
#28645 - 02/24/23 01:35 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
That's great news to hear about young Koty's work and money habits. That will serve him well.

I know several folks that have food sealers. Moe and Wardney each have one, I think both of them are on their 2nd or 3rd machine. They don't have top of the line food sealers, but it seems like when they work, they work perfect. Now and then they'll need to start with a new bag, and try it again.

I searched online yesterday, found one food sealer for about $300. It was listed from "Uline", forget the brand name of the sealer. I didn't read the specs and all.

Uline is a company that deals with bulk items, stuff designed for the food industry, restaurants and all. They've got a lot of neat stuff.

Just thinking about it, Ziploc bags are expensive, buy a little box for $5 or so.

My sister does most of my shopping, she'll buy big packs of meat, whatever is on sale. What am I to do with 4 pounds of pork chops, or a 4# pack of hamburger?

The more I think about it, I could buy one of these good food sealers, between my sister and daughter and I, we'd save more than $300 or $400 within a year. Maybe 6 months? Just from meat that didn't freezer burn. And go bad.

At today's prices, a $100 doesn't go very far, not when you're buying meat.

Top
#28646 - 02/24/23 03:17 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: redsnow]
FLSH ETR Offline
Member

Registered: 12/29/04
Posts: 1202
Loc: Cudahy, Wisconsin,USA
Before I got the vacuum sealer, I used to use them Ziploc baggies, mostly with fish fillets. But they also worked well with chops and brat sized sausages. Slowly lower the filled bag into a bucket of water to force the air out, then seal it quickly before the zipper gets dunked. Also used to fill the baggie with water and freeze them fish solid in ice. Probably still cheaper than the vacuum method, but a lot more messing around.
_________________________
"You're never too old to learn something stupid."

Top
#28647 - 02/25/23 04:43 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Friends of mine butchered a hog last weekend, just one big pig. They skinned it, the hide, well most of it is on the back of my truck. I've been putting it out for the woodpeckers. The dog has been nibbling on it too.

Anyway, they're making scrapple and ponhoss today. Perfect conditions, blowing snow off and on, high 30's or so. Just using one iron kettle.

I think the hog weighed around 400#, the hide will weigh 50 or 75#. Lot of fat on it.

Another guy just stopped by, he's on the way up to help, tend the fire and all.

Jack, the man that gave me the pigskin, he's got 4 or 5 grandkids, young, but old enough to remember. So this will be a good experience for them, a lot of kids never get the chance to see how stuff like this works.

I'd ride up and join the fun this evening, but I'll stuck here working. They are to bring me a slice of ponhoss.

Talking about these food sealers, a few years ago my buddy Moe's freezer died. As well as I remember, it was a $50 part and they lost everything. Not sure, but I think the freezer was under warranty, so they paid for the food lost. One way or another?

I remember that about all of the packages were dated, some of them were 2 or 3, maybe 4 years old. I remember he had 2 or 3 rabbits and some squirells vacuum sealed.

We took all of that trash up on the mountain, cut the plastic off and dumped it near my "lured rock" camera. But if you didn't know better, you'd think the rabbits and other meat were just skinned and put away yesterday.

Years ago we had a discussion here on the forum, about alarms for home freezers, a man really should have one.

Top
#28648 - 02/25/23 08:11 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
musher Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 2407
Loc: Qc.
What's the difference between scrapple and ponhoss? Google didn't help me much.

I have never tasted either and know no one that has.

Thanks.

Top
#28649 - 02/26/23 12:40 AM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Well, my buddy brought me a pan of ponhoss (I'm probably spelling that wrong?) It was still warm, probably still is?

Looks to be a quart size foil pan, anyway it's 2.23 pounds, pan and all.

I'm sure we have folks here on the forum that know more about this stuff than I do, share your thoughts.

Search: Scrapple recipe.

You can buy it in cans.

It's been years and years, but doing scrapple, as well as I remember you use the animal's heart, part of it's liver and maybe even it's kidneys? IT's very very rich!

Either way, you'll boil it's ribs, backbone, all of it's bones and scrape every last little speck of meat off. Take all of the bones out of the kettle and add the cornmeal.

This little pan full that I got today, once it cools and setsup, I'll be able to slice it off. Then you'd just fry it like any other piece of meat. I'll probably flour it, drop it in a skillet oiled up with bacon grease and brown it.

But you can fix it with about anything that you like, pancakes, eggs, sausage, fried taters, maple syrup, it's good stuff!

Next time that Jack stops by, I'll ask if I'm missing any ingrediends. Salt and pepper. That's about all that I can think of, maybe missing from the list?

As well as I can tell from Frank's pictures, they used natural pork casings. I've watched that process, you'd take a dull knife and scrape the intestines across a smooth board, and clean them out good. Wash them around in warm water and try it again a time or 2.

I was always told that there should be enough "casings" in the animal to do a do the whole thing. I'd say that's right.

I'll tell you, our grandparents didn't waste much of a pig.

Top
#28650 - 02/28/23 12:51 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Jack stopped by yesterday and I asked him about this operation. He called it ponhorse. The only thing that they used was the broth, and corn meal. Forgot to ask about salt and pepper, but I'm sure they did.

I'm not sure exactly how they butchered the hog, a lot of people will make "whole hog sausage". Most folks will cut off the loins, save a couple ham roasts, whatever else they'd want, and bone the rest of it out for sausage meat.

So you've got all of those little bits of meat sticking to the bones. Put all of the bones, spine, all of them into the kettle and boil it till the meat falls off. Let it cool off and then pick out the bones.

Then you heat it back up and add the cornmeal. Jack said they used 9 2-pound bags of cornmeal. So 18 pounds.

I figure they had one man stirring, one person dipping it out of the kettle and 2 or 3 people keeping the empty pans lined up and ready.

These guys were cooking outside, in a cast iron kettle over a wood fire and all. Jack has been doing this stuff all of life, so it's nothing new. Plus, that was a learning experience for his grandkids. Just a good time.

Top
#28656 - 03/11/23 02:06 AM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Moe and I were coming out of the mountains the other week, and I told him that I was thinking about buying a vacuum sealer. We talked about the time his freezer went bad. He lost everything.

I was there, we cut all of the plastic bags off, and dumped it all. Who knows how much money down the drain?

Anyway, Moe said that I needed a food sealer like the one that he has.

We talked about the stuff that we dumped and all. Deed honest, most of the stuff looked like it'd been skinned and packaged the day before.

Moe told me that he and Susan had a package of the 6-point, just the evening before, and he said the meat was just the same as the day that he'd sealed the bag.

Honestly, I don't remember the deer that he was talking about. He didn't kill a 6-point this past season, and he didn't kill one the season before. So, that deer meat would have had to have been from the season of 2020, maybe before? So, if you can keep meat, frozen for 2 years or better, that's pretty good.

I remember his last 2 bucks, I was with him, and he killed one of them with my rifle.

Anyway, he sent me a link to a vacuum sealer, very similar to his. It was priced at $180.

I asked him to get me whatever I'd need, with 3 rolls of 8" bags, and 3 rolls of 11" bags, the total price was $265.

Moe offered to come and show me how the thing worked, I haven't read the instruction book. I searched online, and found a U-tube video, the first one that I watched, the lady did a very good job of explaining how it works.

Not sure if it's the best or not? But it's a "Food Saver" 5200 or 5300 series?

Moe, said his is 5 or 6 years old, and he uses his quite a bit. So, that's what I have. I've only used it 10 or 12 times so far. Also has a 5 year limited warranty, it'll pay for itself in 6 months or so. It it keeps on working.

Talking about it being big and bulky, it's about 9x, 9x by 16 inches. I can make room for it under the kitchen sink. And it only weighs 10 pounds. So, that won't be a big deal.

But I like it so far.

Top
#28657 - 03/11/23 05:03 AM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: redsnow]
FLSH ETR Offline
Member

Registered: 12/29/04
Posts: 1202
Loc: Cudahy, Wisconsin,USA
The machine we use is also a 'food saver', model V2244. It's small, barely five pounds. It's probably at least a dozen years old, and I use it just occasionally, mostly when I purchase a family sized package of meat. The con to this machine, and they warn you in the pamphlet, is that you have to wait a half minute before you seal the next envelope. (we call that a beer sipping break) This little guy is 16" wide, 4" high, and 6" deep. And I probably paid a hundred bucks for it back then. My grandgirls were in charge of the packaging and they had no trouble with the 40 lbs of brat links we produced. When you start the vacuum on your machine, I'm going to bet you start sucking your lips together. It's inevitable. grin

Frank.
_________________________
"You're never too old to learn something stupid."

Top
#28658 - 03/12/23 01:42 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
You know, I'm not sure if I pucker-up when I press that vacuum/seal bar or not? But I guess I will be from now on. Just to give it that last little nudge, for good measure.

If you've had 10 or 12 years of use, from a $100 machine, that's very good.

Moe told me that he's using his second vacuum sealer, and it's 5 or 6 years old. I'm not sure how long the first one lasted?

I may have mentioned this before in another thread? One deer season, Moe and I stopped at the neighbors hunting camp, just to say hi and see what's going on. They don't have electric service at their camp. Anyway, there were 2 or 3 guys working up the deer that they'd already killed.

Some of these newer vehicles have an AC outlet, they had a cutting board and vacuum sealer set up on the tailgate of a truck. They were slicing up the meat, sealing it and putting it into an ice chest.

So, that would come in handy when they get home, transfer it into the freezer and you're done.

Moe uses his food sealer a lot, he'll do ramps, berries, fish and all.

But in the long run, this machine will pay for itself. Honestly, I don't think it's going to take long to break even.

Top
#28659 - 03/15/23 12:55 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Above we were talking about scrapple. Here at work the one company that we deal with has a "special sheet", items that are on sale or have the price reduced a little bit. (I also get about 2 E-mails a week listing stuff that the price has increased too.)

Anyway, the company has Kunzler brand, scrapple on sale this week. Eight, 1# packs, my cost is $20. So, that's $2.75/pound or so.

I honestly don't know that much Kunzler meats, but they make about the best bacon that you can buy. It's good.

I'll search: Kunzler scrapple. This is the list of ingredients.

A special blend of quality pork ingredients, combined with whole wheat and corn meal, makes Kunzler Scrapple a unique breakfast meat for a sandwich, side or as a stand alone. Ingredients Pork Broth, Pork, Pork Skins, Pork Livers, Whole Wheat Flour, Corn Meal, 2% or less of: Potassium Lactate, Salt, Water, Natural Flavorings, Sodium Diacetate.

Here at the store, we ordered yesterday, they deliver tomorrow.

They also have "sliced slab Kunzler bacon" on sale. My cost for a 10# slab, is about $35 per box. I'm not sure what a single 1# pack of bacon sells for now? I know it's expensive.

But here at work, we're constantly trying new items, now and then we'll find one that will really take off and sell good. We'll see what happens with scrapple, maybe it will and maybe it won't. There is only one way to find out.

Top
#28660 - 03/15/23 01:29 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: redsnow]
FLSH ETR Offline
Member

Registered: 12/29/04
Posts: 1202
Loc: Cudahy, Wisconsin,USA
How would we prepare it? Oven, fry, boil, nuke, just cold sliced?? It does sound interesting though.

Frank.
_________________________
"You're never too old to learn something stupid."

Top
#28661 - 03/16/23 02:40 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Well, the grocery truck was here a little bit after 8am.

I'll tell you the scrapple is vacuum packed into neat little blocks. Nice looking package. Each pound block is 5" x 2.5" x 2". Smaller than a pound box, of 4 sticks of butter.

I haven't cut one open yet, but just looking at it through the plastic, it seems the meat, liver meat and all is ground very fine. About as fine as the cornmeal.

I thought that maybe they'd include a "favorite recipe", but they didn't. The only directions on the package said: Slice to desired thickness, pay fry until browned and warmed thru.

Think I'll try the first batch on a cookie sheet in the oven.

As far as boiling it, if you'd add water an boil, you'd be able to drink it through a straw.

It's pre-cooked, so you could eat it cold. Doesn't sound very good.

Just to squeeze the pack, it feels similar to Spam, maybe a little bit softer? But I'll try a package soon, and give you my opinion. But I'll try it with eggs or pancakes or fried potatos.

But for a 1 or 2 person meal, it'll be quick and easy.

Top
#28662 - 03/17/23 02:30 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
Hal Offline
Moderator

Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 10239
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
Scrapple, souse, headcheese -- all from the days when they used everything on the hog but the squeal. A friend of mine made headcheese once. I'm not sure about his method but in the end it was okay -- if you were hungry.
_________________________
Endeavor to persevere.

Top
#28663 - 03/17/23 02:35 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
Hal Offline
Moderator

Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 10239
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
We tried something similar. My son bought a bunch of loins cheap and we ground them with some hog fat and spices. We were aiming for breakfast sausage but ended up with more like bratwurst.

Back in the day when we butchered our own hogs, we quite often dedicated a whole hog, or two for sausage.
_________________________
Endeavor to persevere.

Top
#28664 - 03/19/23 01:00 AM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Hmmm, I've heard folks talk about headchees, I don't have a clue, how or what that would be, or how it's made.

I'll let you guys do the math, I bought 8, 1 pound packs of scrapple the other day, for $20. So, I had $2.50 in it per pack.

Here at work they priced it at $3.00 per pack. (gotta sell volume)

Anyway, my buddy Frog stopped by, gave me a pair of "cut resistant gloves" I searched online, those things are $16/pair! (Moe nicked me across my thumb again this last deer season). So, I gave Frog a pack of scrapple.

Lee, one of the guys that helped Jack, and gave me 2 pounds of ponhorse, wouldn't let me pay him or anything. So, they gave me 2 pounds, and I gave him 1 pound of scrapple.

Gary, my #1 mechanic, the same man that sold me a set of 4 truck tires for $600, that's a big discount. I gave Gary a pound of scrapple.

Gary and his family are to make lard, cracklings, ponhoss/scrapple, in a week or so. That's 35 miles from here, and I'll probably be working, but I'd like to go and take a turn tending the fire, and bs'n, if I get the chance.

My man Shawn from the other big store here in town, stopped by last evening, handed me a bag of BBQ pulled pork. Same Shawn that gave me my beef suet for the birds. So, I gave him a pound of scrapple. I figure that #2 of pork, would sell for at least $8. So, I did ok there.

I did sell one pack of scrapple to brother-in-law Mick, so I made $0.50 on that deal.

I cooked up one batch of scrapple for myself, I ate half of it, alone. Baked it in the oven, on a cookie sheet. I'll tell you, it is ground very fine, similar to "Potted meat", at room temperature.

As it was cooking, it gets darker, I'd guess the blood coming out of the liver meat? Cause I first thought that it was starting to brown, and poked it with a fork, and it was just mush.

It's ok, but it will never replace bacon! Kind of a different taste, not sure how to describe it?

But I've got 5 slices here in the cooler, I'll give them to another friend, he just wants to try it before he buys a pack.

But, all of the guys I've listed above, they're all good friends and customers. With the gloves and pulled pork, ponhoss, tire discount and all, I've done ok. This is a small town, we'll take care of each other.

But it all just kind of fell in place last evening, Friday night, guys just getting off of work, ready to get home.

Top
#28669 - 03/25/23 04:52 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: redsnow]
FLSH ETR Offline
Member

Registered: 12/29/04
Posts: 1202
Loc: Cudahy, Wisconsin,USA
Well here ya go, Mr. Redsnow! Finally located this here 'scrapple' stuff. Is certainly a southern thang! grin I checked out our four large stores in the area. No one, and I mean no one knew what scrapple was. Even the butchers never heard of it. Now I realize these butchers only process what's given to them, and not the entire animal. But still, you should know your entire trade. I had to look up the stuff and educate myself before I went shopping so I knew what exactly to ask for. Finally found it in the frozen section at Woodmans. Fried it up in the cast iron skillet with some spuds. Reminded me of Kishka, but more finely ground. Turned out nice and crisp on the outside, kind of mushy on the inside. It comes already cooked so might try it spread cold in a sandwich, with some mayo and lettuce.


_________________________
"You're never too old to learn something stupid."

Top
#28670 - 03/26/23 02:05 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Well, I'm glad you found a pack. I've never heard of that farm/operation that made that batch: Jones dairy farm. I'll search them later.

It is fully cooked, honestly, I don't think I'd care for it as is. Cold.

I think I cut my pound block into 10 pieces, and cooked it all at one time, in the oven. I think if you'd slice it a little bit thinner, and brown both sides it'll firm up in the middle. It'll be more like a piece of meat, something you can cut with a fork.

I taked to Gary (from the tire shop), he's bought 3 packs of scrapple so far. He said that it makes a good snack. So, I tried a slice that I'd cooked, 3 or 4 days before, and tried it cold, in a way, I liked it better than the first time.

But I've talked to all of the guys that I gave a sample pack, they all said it was good, but it does have a different kind of taste.

Talked to Shawn last evening, he's doing "pit beef", never know, he might bring a batch for me? It's just him and his wife and little kid. You know how it is, fix up a big batch of something and get tired of eating the same thing after 2 or 3 days.

But I can't say that scrapple or ponhoss is a southern thing, grits would be a southern thing. Grits are one thing that just never did catch on in this area.

Raising pigs and butchering are just part of our heritage, sad to say, it's almost a thing of the past. It's very similar to the "family farm", they are almost a thing of the past too.

Top
#28687 - 04/27/23 12:34 AM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 3046
Loc: WV
Above we were talking about vacuum food sealers. Mine hasn't paid for itself yet, but one thing that I will say, I haven't had a single piece of meat spoil or go bad since I got the thing.

Another nice thing about using my food sealer, everything in my freezer is stacked in there like books. I'm talking about the little freezer area over the fridge.

I told a friend the other day that if I had anything else in there, I'd need an index folder and need to use the Dewey Decimal System. My freezer is neater and more organized than it's ever been.

Top
#28893 - 02/26/24 03:07 PM Re: Snawwwwsages [Re: FLSH ETR]
jarentz Offline
Member

Registered: 01/25/11
Posts: 73
Loc: central pa.
I have always ate scrapple fried in a cast iron pan with scrambled eggs.
then i pour pancake syrup on top. My wife grew up putting apple butter
on hers. I tried both ways,and i'll stick with mine.

Top
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 >

Moderator:  Hal, musher, redsnow, Ric 

 
Sullivan's Line - Trapping Books, Videos, and Other Products for the Trapper.
 
Design and Production by Sullivan Promotions
Copyright 2000-2017  Sullivan's Scents and Supplies - All rights reserved.