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#28665 - 03/23/23 11:35 AM Autumn Olive spraying.
redsnow Online   content
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We've talked about autumn olive bushes before, I may have mentioned this in another thread too?

Anyway, my brother went to some kind of farm meeting a while back, and they had a discussion about killing the invasive bushes. They said the best time to spray the plant, is when it's coming in bloom and/or in bloom.

Our local autumn olives are just starting to get leaves, so within the next 2, 3 or 4 weeks, they'll be starting to bloom. We have some on the farm and some on the King's place. Before they do totally get out of hand, we're going to try to kill them all.

Anyway, just a reminder, and brush killer is too expensive to waste.

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#28666 - 03/24/23 01:55 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
Hal Offline
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Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 10236
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
smile smile smile smile
Not so terribly many years ago, Wildlife Agencies were handing out Autumn Olive to plant for wildlife habitat.
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#28667 - 03/24/23 04:58 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
Hal Offline
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Posts: 10236
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
When are you going to start in on the bradford pears? smile
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#28668 - 03/25/23 02:13 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
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One bad thing about this deal, I helped plant the stuff. Carry a jug of water around, pack it in just so, to get it going.

Now, 50 years later, I'm going to do my best to kill all of that trash.

One thing my brother reminded me about, they said it's best to lightly spray the bush, with brush killer, and let it work it's way into the roots. I think if you spray it heavy, it'll trop it's leaves, and in a few weeks come right back out with new leaves.

There are autumn olives on the mountain too. Just in one spot. But I'm going to do all of them with a hand pump sprayer. I'll try to find a good 3 or 4 day dry spell, and see what happens. More than likely, I'll need to spray them again? Hope not.

I was reading about bradford pears, I'm not familiar with that plant. We don't have much of a problem with that tree, not in this area. Now and then I'll find a bush with thorns, small bushes. The only other tree we have with thorns would be Honey locust. They are mean, those thorns will bust a tractor tire. I think we've pretty much got them killed off, on our property.

Right here in this area, probably 3 of the biggest plant/tree pests that we have would cedar trees, multiflora rose, with locust brush being a pain too.

Seems like if you scratch down to bare dirt, some kind of unwanted plant or tree will sprout, within a year or 2. Give them a 5 year head start, and they are out of control.

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#28678 - 04/07/23 12:01 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
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I'm going to keep my notes here on the forum, so I can keep track of what's going on and all.

4/4/23, I mixed up a batch of brush killer, just in a 2 gallon hand pump sprayer. The man told me to mix it 75:1. So, I mixed it, pretty much 2oz/gallon. It will really foam up and puts off some nasty fumes.

Just to try out the sprayer and adjust the tip, I pumped it up and sprayed here at the house a little bit. I've cut a few elm trees out back, and the sprouts keep coming up from the roots, and the stumps. I sprayed them on the 4th, the leaves were wilty and looked dead within 24 hours. Kind of surprised me. After 48 hours they still look dead.

Yesterday, 4/5/23, I took the sprayer to the farm. Started on the autumn olives, honestly, they are not as bad as I thought. A lot of the olive plants that I sprayed were less than 6 or 7 feet tall. Lots of them were just a single stem. I'll tell you, once you get an eye for those leaves, you can pick them out from 50 yards.

Anyway, it started out a beautiful morning, up in the 50's and calm. It was better than 60* when I started spraying. Worked my way down around the side of the ridge, up and down the hollow, I spritzed just about all of them. I missed a couple bushes, ones that were hard to get too. Also zapped some of the rose bushes and some other kind of dark green bush. Not sure what the heck they are?, but they are worthless.

Our pastures are just starting to green up, the farm looks good. We have the farm leased to a man, he's got quite a few newborn calves, and a few cows yet to go.

But in 2 or 3 weeks, we'll be able to see what's going on with the brush killer. I used most of that 2 gallons, have maybe a pint left? Just lightly misting the plants, it goes a long way.

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#28679 - 04/10/23 11:39 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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April 9, 2023. Sprayed on the King's property, I used 2 gallons. From ditch, past barn, out to main road.

I missed a clump of olives below Doug's.

I guess all together I was out walking around for better than 2 hours, spraying. I sprayed a bunch of rose bushes, and a couple of small cedar trees. Using this spray is new to me, so, I'll see what happens in 2 or 3 weeks.

Really nice day yesterday, I had 27* at daylight, up to about 60* when I started spraying. I was reading, they say 60* and up is best. Clear sunny day and the sky is still clear. So the brush killer should be doing it's thing.

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#28680 - 04/16/23 01:47 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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I'll give you an update on the spraying in a minute, first I want to tell you this.

Since I started spraying, I've had 2 farmers tell me: "Don't get that stuff on you". My friends will stop by and ask what I've been doing, and that's when we'll talk about autumn olives and all.

I'll tell you, using a hand pump sprayer, spraying bushes that are 10 feet tall or so? Keeping the spray off of yourself is easier said than done. I thought about this the other day, if you can smell something, those little particles are in your nose and in your lungs. They are in your eyes and on any exposed skin.

I forget what day it was, but I first thought that I was getting pinkeye. I've got some pinkeye medicine, so I treated myself 2 or 3 times? My eyes were puffy, red as a beet. And that one day, it seemed like my eyes would gunk up, every 15 or 20 minutes. I was here at work and I'll tell you that was a pain in the ass.

I was reading the other day, about symptoms of exposure to brush killer. This is some serious stuff. If it's bad enough, you could cough up blood, can cause long term problems, cancer, etc.

I've been wearing a long sleeve shirt, but I know that I've had it on my fingers. Adjusting the spray nozzle is a 2 handed job, and you're going to get a drop or 2 on your fingers. If you get it on your fingers, some time or another you're going to touch your eye.

But I'll tell you what happened. I was spraying an olive bush near the edge of a field, I had the breeze at my back, I felt the wind shift and just couldn't get out of the way fast enough.

Anyway, just a reminder. What happened to me was my mistake, lesson learned. And I hope it doesn't happen to anyone else.

But I've got rubber gloves, safety glasses, a jug of water and all in the truck. I'm going to mix up another batch of spray in a little bit and head up on the mountain. Just a guess, there's probably about 50 autumn olive bushes out at the end of the road. It'll take me a while to cut the trees out of the road, once I get out there it should only take an hour or so to spray them all.

I've checked some of the olive bushes that I've sprayed, at the 2, 3 and 4 day mark. The leaves are still greenish and wilty looking, so they should be sending their poison back to the root system. And the rose bushes that I've sprayed are looking sick too.

4/16/23 sprayed olives on the mtn.

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#28681 - 04/17/23 11:37 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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The mountain olives have been sprayed.

Note: Missed a batch below the road, north of John's camp.

I'll add more later.

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#28682 - 04/17/23 01:17 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
Hal Offline
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Registered: 07/17/00
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Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
What is the name of the chemical you are spraying them with?
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#28683 - 04/17/23 04:11 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Honestly, I'm not sure. Basically it's Roundup, I think.

Tell you what the deal was, these "brush cutter" guys are always hitting me up for keys, combinations and all to different properties. Asking who owns this and that, and directions how to get there. So I asked the foreman to get me some brush killer.

As well as I remember, it was like a 4-gallon plastic jug, with maybe 1.5 gallons of spray inside. ? It was a thin jug, like milk jug plastic. So I put it into a 5-gallon plastic bucket, with a spout. I rinsed out the old jug, 3 or 4 times and dumped it all into the bucket. I'll guess I ended up with about 2 gallons total, I've only used 12 ounces so far. But the label on the old jug was eaten off.

Talking to a man the other day, I think he said Roundup was something like $80/quart now. Not positive.

Above I said that once you get an eye for olives you can pick them out from 50 feet. Bump that up to over 1/4 mile now. Yesterday, I was on a public road, I guess just the way the sun was hitting them, I could see that trash.

It's funny in a way, I'll be driving 50 MPH and spot autumn olives, they're everywhere! I'll tell you now, folks will be fighting olive brush for years and years!

The road where I was yesterday has been blocked by trees since back in December, it was a mess. I burnt a tank of gas through my saw and a good bit more.

A while back we had a discussion about ash trees, I found a few ash sprouts that are up, 8 or 10 feet tall. Nice looking little trees. Also found a batch of pawpaw sprouts, they've never been that high on the mountain.

Anyway, I used 1.5 gallons of spray, I'm sure I missed some olives. Plus that one cluster below the road. They are out in bloom now, honestly, I think they have a nice smell. Otherwise, they are worthless.

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#28684 - 04/20/23 02:02 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
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I'll comment about what the plants are looking like at the 10 day mark. I checked the plant's on the King's property yesterday.

The autumn olives that I've sprayed are a different shade of green. There is one cluster of olive plants, give or take it's a 30 foot circle of brush. The leaves are greenish, but a different shade, and they are covered with bloom. Maybe I didn't spray them heavy enough? I just stopped there for a few seconds, but I noticed there was a butterfly and a few honeybees buzzing around. Just my opinion, it's like the insects where there, but they didn't land and mess around there very long.

My honeybee man brought his hives back, a month or so ago? So, there are 15 or 16 good hives 1/4 mile away. It was warm enough, the bees were out. It just seemed to me, they knew something was wrong. I don't want to kill his bees.

The multiflora rose bushes that I've sprayed, they are looking dead. I hope. That's at the 10 day mark.

Killing brush is a slow process, I really won't know for sure what's dead and what's still going strong until next spring. What I need to spray again and all. But I'll keep pecking away at them.

I'll tell you this, once you get a few olive bushes and go look around, most likely you've got 5 times as many as you thought. That's exactly what I've found. Same with the rose bushes.

Talking about brush killer. Search: best 5 brush killers. I found one online the other day, forget the name, but it was $90/gallon, give or take. For a homeowner or someone with property, a gallon would go a long way.

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#28685 - 04/24/23 11:04 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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4/23/23: The mountain olives below the road were sprayed, and most rose bushes on the south end.

I was on the mountain yesterday and finished spraying the olives, they were all in a little cluster, maybe in a 40 yard circle. Something like that.

Before I started spraying, I checked the ones that I'd sprayed a week before. At the 7-day mark, some of the leaves are wilty and twisted up. One thing that I did notice about the olives, I couldn't smell them yesterday, a week ago I could smell their scent.

The temperature was 46* on the mountain, maybe that was part of it? Otherwise I'd guess it's the spray working on the plants?

It's hard to describe a scent, but autumn olives have like a gentle, sweet, pleasant aroma when they are in bloom. Once you know the smell, you'll know that there are olives there someplace.

Talking about multiflora bushes, at the 7-day mark, the ones that I've sprayed are looking sick. Coming off of the mountain, if I could see 4 or 5 plants, I'd stop and spray them. Single rose bushes, I'd drive on past. I'll be back up there in a week or 2, and kind of fill in the empty spots and get them sprayed.

Thinking about it now, I've used 7 gallons of brush killer so far. I'd guess that I've sprayed about 3/4's of the autumn olives on the King's property and the farm. And around 90% of the olives on the mountain. I'm not keeping track of my time or anything like that. I'll get back out spraying as I have time, and fill in the holes. Right now it's more or less a waiting game.

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#28686 - 04/26/23 11:49 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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4/26/23: I checked the autumn olives bushes on the farm today. At the 21 day mark, they are looking sick.

I went in the same gate that I did 3 weeks ago, when I first started spraying. The first bush that I sprayed, it's leaves are curled up, and it's bloom is a different color. The bloom is usually white, now it's kind of a yellow. Not much of a scent.

I looked over the bush, and kind of slapped it, I didn't smack it hard. But part of it's leaves and bloom fell off. So, I'll take that as a good sign that the spray is working.

Kind of filled in the holes, and sprayed another pint of brush killer today or so?

Moe and I hunted back on the Ratliff place this morning, that property corners with the farm. There a few autumn olives up there, not many, but I plan on spritzing them soon. Maybe tomorrow?

But, so far, the olive brush that I've sprayed, is looking sick. I just hope that I've been spraying them enough and not too much. Time will tell.

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#28688 - 04/29/23 12:19 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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4/27/23. Sprayed olive bushes on the Ratliff place.

The temperature was up to 70* or so last evening. Didn't use much spray, maybe a quart?

I've been kind of filling in the holes where I've sprayed. Here and there. The olives are looking sick.

We've had some much needed rain today, so hopefully the brush killer is doing it's job.

I've missed a few bushes, but I've got most of them. Just a waiting game now.

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#28700 - 05/25/23 11:37 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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5/24/23. Sprayed olive bushes at Poppie's. Poppie was my Granddad, Mom's father. The family cemetery is up there and they just set my sister Jenny's headstone the other week. Sister Barb, Jenny's oldest girl and a few of us went up on Mother's Day.

I've mentioned this before, once you get an eye for autumn olives, they just stand out.

Anyway, I used about a gallon of spray. I was spraying olives, rose bushes, posion ivy too.

We're coming up on 2 months since I started spraying olives. I'll tell you that spray is bad news for multiflora rose bushes. Wish now that I'd started this little project 20 years ago.

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#28703 - 05/30/23 03:09 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3695
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
Just read through this thread . Please be sure of what you are spraying. I think its round-up is not really a good answer.

Herbicide..... Glyphosate would certainly not be my choice for Autumn Olive control. A product with 2-4-D as the primary active ingredient will give you good results with out the draw backs. Both are systemic herbicides. The glyphosate is broad spectrum meaning it will kill darn near everything. 2-4-D is specific to dicots (broad leaved plants). If your spraying Round up 10' in the air your effecting a lot of plants you may not want to.

When working on autumn olive here I cut and spray. Cut the stem close to the ground and immediately spray the cut stem. I use a 35% 2-4-D solution with a 1/2 ounce dish washing soap per gallon as a surfacant. Spray the cut stump especially the cambium layer to run off.I also put some pond dye (food coloring will work) in the solution so I know where I've sprayed. Very effective

And you don't need to carry two gallons of water up an down those hills. A 1/2 gallon goes a long ways

When flowering is a good time, when developing fruits is better

Hope that helps some

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#28704 - 05/31/23 12:49 PM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Well, the label on the jug was competely eaten off, I couldn't make out one letter. Nothing but a glue spot, where the label was.

The spray that I'm using won't kill grass. My buddy Jim's son either is or was working on a crew that was spraying power lines. He said what they used was a "generic" Roundup. He was working for a different company, but I'd assume that they are using about the same stuff.

I know the guys that work for the DOH and the railroad. They spray around road signs and all, the railroad sprays the tracks, once or twice per summer. Next time I talk to one of them, I'll ask exactly what they are spraying.

I've only mixed a pint (16 ounces) of concentrate so far. The dog jumped over the side of the truck one day and broke the junky plastic spray wand on my best sprayer. I rinsed out the old sprayer 3 or 4 times and put it into the new one. So, it's probably mixed around 100: 1 now?

The last time I sprayed, there was a poison ivy/oak plant growing up the side of one of Granddads sheds, I sprayed it. It was probably and hour later when I came back past it, it was already wilted.

I've been wearing long pants, long sleeve shirt/jacket, safety glasses and rubber gloves.

I'm just a one man crew, nobody is paying me or anything, I'm just doing it for myself and the family.

I wasn't at the farmer's workshop that my brother attended a while back. But I'll tell you what the man told him. He said that autumn olives are a pretty smart plant, it's best to lightly mist it, and let the poison do it's job.

I guess autumn olives would be like any other plant, when it gets cold the sap would go down, when it warms sap will go up. We've had some temps below freezing since I started spraying, and we've been up in the 80's or better too.

This is kind of like watching paint dry, but I've checked some of the olives that I've sprayed. Most of the plants still have their leaves, some of them are crunchy. You can squeeze a leaf between your fingers and hear it crunch. I've checked the very tip top of the branches, even the new growth, it just looks kind of wilted.

I'm not sure? But in my opinion, the longer that these dead/dry leaves hang on the plant the better.

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#28705 - 06/01/23 11:41 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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I went to the farm and checked the olives yesterday, it's been almost 2 months since I first sprayed, the first time. I sprayed on the farm one more time, just filling in the holes, spraying the olives that I missed.

It's hard to describe what a plant looks like and all. Some of the autumn olive leaves are yellow, I will guess maybe 1 leaf per 100. Those leaves are dead. I pulled off one leaf and when I squeezed it I heard it crunch. That leaf is dead. I pulled off another leaf and kind of rolled it up with my fingers, really it was almost like rolling up the foil wrapper that comes with a stick of chewing gum. That leaf isn't doing the plant any good.

The tip tops of the plants, they are kind of curled up, it's the newest of the new growth. Honestly, I don't think that they've grown at all. I've thought about flagging a couple bushes, but it's not like they are in my back yard where I can go check them everyday.

Above where we were talking about cutting off the olive bush and spraying the stump. I parked the truck near this one clump of olives that I've sprayed. That clump is about 30 feet X 15 feet. Surrounded by multiflora, it's a tangled up mess, with maybe 50 olive branches coming up.

I sized it up yesterday and thought about it. For one man, with my big weedeater with the brush blade, a chainsaw and a rake, I honestly don't thing I could cut it all in an hours time.

The day that I sprayed that clump of trash, I spent maybe 5 minutes spraying. Maybe only 3 minutes?

But I looked around, I really can't see any place where the "overspray" is killing anything else. The one spot where I sprayed is within 75 yards of our fruit trees, they all look good, except where the frost got them. So far I think we're good.

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#28737 - 07/04/23 11:38 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
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Loc: WV
One of the guys from the WV DOH stopped by the other day, and gave me a list of the chemicals that they're using, to control brush and weeds. They spray around road signs and guardrails and all.

Round Up. Grass

Oust. Trees, root kill.

Vanquish: Broad leaf plants.

That's what they are using in this area, I will assume that they know what works.

I've searched and read about the different sprays, all of them are $100/gallon, give or take.

Three months ago I started spraying autumn olives, some of the plants I've checked and some of them I've not been back. I did flag a couple of the olives. Honestly, I don't see any new growth. I can look at an olive plant that I've sprayed, looking at it from 50 yards and see daylight through the plant. They've lost a lot of leaves.

I mentioned this above, but I won't really know which plants are dead dead until next spring. So far, I think I'm at least holding them at bay.

My daughter and I went for a Sunday drive on Sunday. Calling for storms or we'd have taken out of kayaks. I took her up to one of the local hunt clubs, she's been there lots of times when she was a kid, but we didn't get to spend much time together while she was in school and all.

Anyway, I found an autumn olive up there, so, I'll spray that plant too. We went off on the east side of the mountain, and I'll tell you the olives have competely taken over some of those small farms and pastures.

Someone, years ago spent a bunch of man hours clearing those fields.

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#28739 - 07/08/23 11:33 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Registered: 06/11/06
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Loc: WV
Search: Autumn olive control techniques explained.

I found an article the other day, they had an outdoor workshop at the "Twisted Fork Airfield", I had to search, that's in Michigan. But that article is the most informative that I've found.

A couple things that I did learn from the article. Olive seeds can stay dormant for 2 years. So, we're looking at a 3 year project.

Cutting off the bush and spraying the stumps, within 5 minutes (as quick as you can) is 100% effective. And that method is also effective in the fall.

Two chemicals that work best are: Glyphosate and Triclopyr.

Also search: Autumn olive control techniques explained Utube.

One video that I just watched is only 2 minutes long. The lady that narrates the video talks really fast, but she covers it well.

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#28788 - 09/28/23 11:43 AM Re: Autumn Olive spraying. [Re: redsnow]
redsnow Online   content
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Loc: WV
It's been almost 6 months since I started spraying autumn olive bushes, I'll make a note of what they look like now.

The olives that I've sprayed, looking at a bush from say, 50 yards, you can see daylight through the bush. I'm finding more and more dead branches, I mean branches that are dry and brittle.

We haven't had our first frost yet, but it won't be long. For the time being, I'm going to let things ride, and we'll see what things look like next Spring.

There is one olive bush, that I am going to cut down, the stump on that one is right at 6 inches in diameter. That's the biggest one that I've found. I'd like to count the growth rings. Just curious.

Most of the olives that I've sprayed are growing more like in a clump. Some of them have over 20 stems.

Another thing that I'll comment on, the multiflora bushes that I've sprayed pretty heavy. The tops are dead, I mean from the ground up. Who knows about the roots?

I found an article about the best way to control multiflora, it said to spray them during the growing season. It's too late to spray this year. But my plan is to start on them next spring.

We've got quite a few rose bushes on the farm, honestly they are not really that bad. That will take quite a bit of spray, but it'd be nice to kill them off too.

Thinking about the olive that I'm going cut, thinking about giving the "log" to one of my friends who has a wood lathe, and see what he comes up with. I might be able to get a 15 inch log?

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