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#7515 - 02/11/06 06:30 AM Considering a boat...
Claude Offline
Member

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 102
Loc: Freeman Missouri
I have a river here that I have been trying to trap...
Steep banks, log jams, rocks, sand bars, choke points, hard to wade...
No great places to put a boat in the water, but some bridges where I could park and hump something light...

I have focused mainly on water trapping...

A small lake that I trap has some remote areas that are way too time consuming to walk to.

A marsh in the same area, I have been pulling otter, beaver, and rats, just on one little spot...

Been thinking about this for a while. Would love to have a powered jon boat, but would have to travel too far to be able to use it...

Have been thinking about kayaks, canoes, pirogues, small plastic pontoons, etc. the 5hp briggs and stratton outboard motor and electric trolling motors...

Seems that the more stability and payload capacity ya get, the harder it will be to paddle, and drag (heavier)...
So I am leaning towards a canoe, seems that ya can put more stuff in it and it will be fairly light, and maybe not too hard to paddle.
Think I can make something to plug into my reciever on the pickup to extend the bed where I can just let it hang out of the back of the truck, for quick, easy loading and unloading...
I see they make a folding carrier, with inflatable tires to walk it into remote areas...

Just wondering how stable the thing will be getting in and out of it?

I really think I could do well in the river if I can figure out how to work it as it is not being trapped because of the difficulty.

I am thinking 4 or 5 loads/launches daily...
No motor, light, basic...

Your input please- cool

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#7516 - 02/11/06 07:12 AM Re: Considering a boat...
musher Offline


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 1963
Loc: Qc.
Coleman canoe. It's very stable, indestructable, carries lots of stuff, and can be loaded/unloaded off a roof rack by one person.

I've had the same one since 1983.It's still in great condition despite having been abused.

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#7517 - 02/11/06 07:18 AM Re: Considering a boat...
Claude Offline
Member

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 102
Loc: Freeman Missouri
Ah I see coleman is mfged by Pelican, That is what I was looking at "Pelican" RamX plastic...

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#7518 - 02/11/06 09:59 AM Re: Considering a boat...
french fry Offline
Member

Registered: 03/04/05
Posts: 46
Loc: drexel hill, pa
i don't do alot of water trapping but i do alot of canoeing. i have an old aluminum canoe, light weight, no problem moving it around alone. they are pretty stable if you stay in the center. i made a make shift pontoon out of two aluminum poles and a piece of foam,attaches with hose clamps to the cross bars. this makes the canoe much more stable with alot of weight in the boat, but it does make paddleing harder. keep all the weight centered in the canoe and you'll be fine, sounds fun !!!

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#7519 - 02/11/06 01:26 PM Re: Considering a boat...
skinner69 Offline
Member

Registered: 07/24/05
Posts: 152
Loc: stillwater,new york
Water trapping from a boat is indeed fun and opens up a whole new world to the guy willing to put in the extra time.I've been boatin for fur for 10 years now and i don't run into any other trappers along my route,and my fur take has increased greatly.You can run a huge line by boat compared to what you can walkin.I use a boat from otter outdoors in minnesota called the Final Attack.Its made from heavy duty plastic and looks like a wedge,weighs 70lbs. and has 2 wheels built into the back for draggin it around or over whatever is in your way.It's 8 feet long and can handle a 2hp motor or an electric trolling motor.Only drawback to that is the battery takes up a little room.I prefer a little 2hp for mine.I usually strap my gear to the nose of the boat and that leaves the inside cockpit to put your fur.I know it sounds small but i've had a full size whitetail deer in there with me and still had plenty of room.It is a flat bottom type craft and is wide and very stable-you can sit on the edge and it won't even tilt.Only drawback is if you get over 1 foot of chop on the water you start getting spray-remember the boat is shaped like a wedge or ramp.You should be able to find this boat in a cabelas catalog or on their website-it's made for duck hunting but it works the nuts for trapping.I can load mine right in the back of my gmc jimmy with about 1 foot hanging out the back.I run a 5 mile water line on a small river but have had it on the big water many times.

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#7520 - 02/12/06 09:21 AM Re: Considering a boat...
Freepistol Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 01/13/06
Posts: 14
Loc: District 7, PA
How do you boaters get around the ice?
On the North Branch of the Susquehanna River in PA, we get edge icing ovenight and we can get huge icebergs flowing just as quickly. Do you get iced out often?
I guess my apprehension is what keeps most people off the water and gives you all the trapping room you need.
Yesterday a goose hunter fell overboard and is presumed dead. They did rescue his Chapstick and cigarettes.

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#7521 - 02/12/06 10:32 AM Re: Considering a boat...
skinner69 Offline
Member

Registered: 07/24/05
Posts: 152
Loc: stillwater,new york
Well,i've never hit a floating iceberg before while trapping,i drive around them.As far as edge ice goes i just run the boat up onto it and try and break my way thru to shore to keep my beaver sets going.I can usaully break up to 1 1/2" thick ice with my little "Attack" boat,but much more then that and i'm done.I do burn up a fair number of water pump impellers while doing it though,but their cheap and i can change then pretty quick.

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#7522 - 02/12/06 09:05 PM Re: Considering a boat...
bushog4 Offline
Member

Registered: 11/12/01
Posts: 28
Loc: scottsburg virginia
I do alot of water trapping from boats and canoes.I really couldn't operate without one.I have found my canoe to be the best on smaller rivers as I can put it in just about anywhere.I have an old town one man canoe that only weighs about 30 pounds.It has lots of room.I highly recomend a double bladed paddle as it is easier to go upsteam in current not having to switch sides with the paddle.Its also geat to steady the boat when you are getting out or tending sets from the boat.I have tried using an electric motor but with the weight of the battery and all it's actually slower than just paddleing.I also use a john boat at times on bigger water,or when I need to carry alot of gear.I rarly have to deal with ice.

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#7523 - 02/13/06 06:27 AM Re: Considering a boat...
Claude Offline
Member

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 102
Loc: Freeman Missouri
Well I bought a Pelican Colorado yesterday.
I saw it listed online @ 429 & got it fer 279 onsale... think I done alright
Took the toolbox out of the Dakota 4WD and with the tailgate down got about 5-1/2 foot sticking out of the back... laugh
Going to finish out beaver season with it and see how it goes...
I imagine I'm gonna find some good spots for next season... cool

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#7524 - 02/13/06 04:48 PM Re: Considering a boat...
musher Offline


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 1963
Loc: Qc.
Use the money you saved to buy a good, comfortable life jacket. That way you'll be certain to wear it. :rolleyes:

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#7525 - 02/13/06 08:02 PM Re: Considering a boat...
RiverOtter Offline
Member

Registered: 02/27/05
Posts: 646
Loc: Monashee Mtns, British Columbi...
A floatation coat(looks like a winter jacket) is as good, and its like your not even wearing a life jacket. I have one made by Mustang.

Congratulations on your new canoe, I have a 17' Valhalla and would be lost without it.

RO smile

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#7526 - 02/13/06 10:40 PM Re: Considering a boat...
Nutra Rat Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 11/16/05
Posts: 7
Loc: La Place, LA
I think the best trapping boat is a go-devil. It's got a horizontal shaft that you raise and lower as you need it. It's perfect for the tough places we trap--ditches, soft bottoms, weeds and floating vegetation.

I have a homemade job I bought a few years ago. It's a fiberglass vhull about 12' long and 2.5 ft wide. The motor is a 5 horse briggs. It's light. I don't need a boat launch. I can pull up to a canal, unload, mount the motor and be on my way in about 5 minutes. With the motor attached, I can drag it up over berms and levys. It's kinda tippy. I can't carry another adult. I've had it running down ditches 3 ft wide and with only 6" or so of water.

The fiberglass takes a beating. A light 10ft jon boat with one of these motors on the back would be better--steadier. Stay out of the big water though.

Nute

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#7527 - 02/18/06 06:19 AM Re: Considering a boat...
Claude Offline
Member

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 102
Loc: Freeman Missouri
Update:
Well I hate ta admit it, but things with the Pelican Colorado have not went as well as anticipated... :rolleyes:

On It's maiden voyage in the lake it seemed to do OK, a little tough to control in the wind. As I suspected lots of beaver sign on the other side...

The river was another story all together (very stable compared to what)...
Yep you guessed it, rolled it over. In Feburary that is not a good thing. All I lost was a nice pair of #9 Kliens that I have had a long time. Luckily I discovered this problem before I had a bunch of traps, tools, and other stuff onboard.

My neighbor loaned me an old 10' jon boat (riveted), but I dont think it is very good condition, and even if it was I dont think it would have the payload capacity to do what I want to do...

So I have decided to add a few accessories to the Colorado. Hopefully these items will make my Canoe the trapping vehicle, that I am looking for...


Stabilizers
These are adjustable in and out and up and down. When extended and up, the pontoons will catch ya.
Extended and down, lets dance... laugh

[img]http://www.canoegear.com/catalog/image.php?productid=154[/img]
Hinged Motor Mount
I thought the hinge may work well as there is a lot of debris in the waters I am working...


Canoe Dolly
Load gear in canoe, and roll to the marsh... cool

I hope all of this stuff meets my expectations, I will do a follow-up...

Dont hesitate to add your ideas...

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#7528 - 02/18/06 03:57 PM Re: Considering a boat...
RiverOtter Offline
Member

Registered: 02/27/05
Posts: 646
Loc: Monashee Mtns, British Columbi...
A question for you Claude.

Does your canoe have a Keel? They make tracking much easier on open water.

Also to help with steering control, sit in the front passenger seat, but facing the rear seat. This will shift some weight towards the middle of the canoe. Load your gear more towards the opposite half of the canoe than your sitting to keep the bow lower in the water. Canoes handle totally different depending on how they are loaded. I hope you can understand my typing.

Another little trick is to give the paddle a little bit of a hook away from the boat at the end of your stroke. With a little practice, you can paddle all day from one side of the canoe(if your one arm doesn't fall off) and still keep a straight course. Is a much more enjoyable way to paddle than doing the old "2 strokes on one side, dripping across your gear and paddling a couple on the other side to stay straight.

RO smile

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#7529 - 02/18/06 04:22 PM Re: Considering a boat...
Claude Offline
Member

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 102
Loc: Freeman Missouri
Uh yup, it has a keel...

I dont see any difference in the Canoe between the bow and the stern... confused

But I will give it a try once this hard freeze is over...

OK hadda go measure them... chuckle

It is a 3 seater...
The one I been sitting in (calling it the stern) is 54-1/2" from the tip of the stern to the inside edge (mid ship) of the seat.

The other end (calling it the bow) is 43-1/2" from the tip of the bow to the inside edge of the seat...

Actually after rolling it, I decided that sitting in the seats weren't such a good idea, and continued my journey kneeling on the floor in front of the seat... laugh

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#7530 - 02/18/06 08:12 PM Re: Considering a boat...
RiverOtter Offline
Member

Registered: 02/27/05
Posts: 646
Loc: Monashee Mtns, British Columbi...
My canoe has "tractor" style seats, which makes the bow and stern a little more obvious.

In your case, if you have "bench" style seats and your measuring from the tip of the canoe to the edge of the seat that is closest to the center of the canoe, then the one with the smallest measurement is the Stern. The front seat has extra room for the persons legs, as they need to face forward. The "front" seat becomes the "back" seat when canoeing solo, for better control, unless you have enough gear at the opposite end to keep the canoe sitting fairly level in the water. Sitting backwards in the front seat offsets the amount of weight you need to keep the canoe sitting level.

Sorry if my post makes you feel like I'm talking to you like your in grade 8, but I don't know how much canoe experience you have and you can just disregard the stuff you already know.

As for the tippyness of your canoe, if you have a 36" width at the widest point and your canoe is in the 17' range it should not be a problem if you move slow and don't stand up. Mine has a fairly flat bottom which also adds to its stability. The main thing is to NOT overload and canoe and stay low and move slow.

For the record, the first canoe I bought was a 15 footer with a narrow beam, 30" or less IIRC. I didn't get wet, but I came darn close a few times before I finally sold it.

RO smile

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#7531 - 02/19/06 06:08 AM Re: Considering a boat...
musher Offline


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 1963
Loc: Qc.
My Coleman is extremely stable (for a canoe!). I used to shoot rapids with it. It's been loaded with three guys, duck gear, and decoys. I was younger and braver then. It still often gets loaded with my son and I, 2 dogs, and decoys. I'm not stupid with my son.

Listen to RO. When alone, pick the seat with the least legroom. Then sit so you are facing the opposite way. The j-stroke he mentions is the only way to paddle. It takes a little practice but it will keep you dryer. A 2 bladed paddle will work (kayak style) also.

An outboard sticking far off the side will de-stabalize the boat. They even de-stabalize the boat when they are close to the hull. The side with the engine becomes extremely vulnerable to taking in water. Turn slowly and compensate with your weight.

Bet you're glad that you had on a life jacket! wink

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#7532 - 02/20/06 10:18 AM Re: Considering a boat...
45/70 Offline
Member

Registered: 04/10/01
Posts: 832
Loc: South Georgia, usA
I was seriously entertaining thoughts of buying a new canoe ( I have had & used canoes for most of my life.), when I had to have my knees replaced. That sort of ended the project.

However, I had seen a canoe that was very interesting for application as a trapping boat. Here is the link:

http://www.bearcreekcanoes.com/canoe.html

Bear Creek makes two models that I believe would be almost tailor-made for trapping use.
Those models are the Big Duck and The Odd Duck. These two boats are different from any other canoes I have ever seen.

I remember there was an article featuring these two canoes in FFG several years ago.

Adios,
45/70,
RKBA !!!

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#7533 - 02/25/06 01:42 PM Re: Considering a boat...
Claude Offline
Member

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 102
Loc: Freeman Missouri



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#7534 - 02/25/06 04:03 PM Re: Considering a boat...
RiverOtter Offline
Member

Registered: 02/27/05
Posts: 646
Loc: Monashee Mtns, British Columbi...
That looks like one scookum trappin' rig! I especially like those 2 brown counter weights in the front.

Do those outriggers work good?

RO smile

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#7535 - 02/25/06 04:23 PM Re: Considering a boat...
Claude Offline
Member

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 102
Loc: Freeman Missouri
Look again, 3 brown counterwieghts... smile

The stabilizers work great, just gotta be careful not to run em into stuff. Beats a February swim... eek

The trolling motor is nice also, had to lengthen the wires as the battery goes up in the bow. The gunwales on the Colorado dont have much of a lip, for the accessories to secure to, so I added 1"x1"x6" aluminum angles, and attached them with stainless steel hardware.

I appreciate the ideas posted here. I think once I learn how to drive it, the canoe will work great.

Still need to come up with some kinda rack for the Dakota 4x4, so I can put the toolbox back in, and have the bed back...

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#7536 - 03/11/06 11:53 AM Re: Considering a boat...
trapper32 Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/06/04
Posts: 5
Loc: Northwest Iowa
Those stabilizers look sharp, are you able to stand in the canoe now? How stable do they make it?

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#7537 - 03/11/06 04:08 PM Re: Considering a boat...
Claude Offline
Member

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 102
Loc: Freeman Missouri
A lot more stable than without em... laugh

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#7538 - 03/11/06 10:11 PM Re: Considering a boat...
snydboshawn Offline
Member

Registered: 11/17/05
Posts: 67
Loc: NE OHIO
Claude is that a blonde beaver I see in there? What do you figure your total weight is with those beaver included? I ask because it sure makes a big difference with that dead weight pulling up any type of incline. Of course, the lighter the better.

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#7539 - 03/12/06 09:01 AM Re: Considering a boat...
bobkat Offline
Member

Registered: 04/17/05
Posts: 113
Loc: Ruckersville, Va
Nice set up Claude. I trap small creeks and rivers out of my 12ft Pungo kayak. Its fairly stable and carries what I need on small water. Beats toting big bvrs back to the truck. I have two canoes, one 16ft royalex and the other a 17ft square stern Grumman aluminum. The square stern will haul 900+ lbs but won't turn easily because of the keel. It is extremely stable; you can fall out of it but you can't turn it over. The royalex is a white water with no keel and will roll easily. Each has its own uses and flaws. Claude, Have you considered a plumbers or lader rack for your Dakota. Slide the canoe up there and you can still have the tool box and bed space freed up.

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#7540 - 03/12/06 03:31 PM Re: Considering a boat...
WalkonWater Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 02/28/06
Posts: 13
Loc: New York
I like my old Sears jon boat. Super stable and light.
The stabilizers for the canoe seem to counter any advantage that the narrow design of a canoe would offer..Getting in narrow channels etc..The jon offers better stability, storage space without sacrificing on being lite weight.

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#7541 - 03/13/06 03:50 PM Re: Considering a boat...
Talachulitna Jim Offline
Member

Registered: 12/09/00
Posts: 317
Loc: Anchorage, AK
"Does your canoe have a Keel? They make tracking much easier on open water."

Yes, and they are guaranteed to cause you to flip in moving water, eventually.

I wouldn't have a keel on any canoe I own! The remedy for tracking is to learn how to paddle.

Jim

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#25367 - 10/17/17 12:22 PM Re: Considering a boat... [Re: Claude]
Archive Offline


Registered: 03/12/03
Posts: 1116
Dated for search.

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