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#7612 - 01/13/06 06:52 AM Bodygrip triggers in swift water.
Dktfireman Offline
Member+

Registered: 07/13/05
Posts: 338
Loc: New Hampshire
I have searched the archives, but still have a question. Will the "Dobbins modification" help with a trap that keeps firing from water pressure, I guess the current is too strong there.
I set it and it stays but the next day when I check it it is fired again. What would you do to correct the problem. I have two 330's and fencing covering an old submerged beaver dam and one in the only side flow.
There are several otter traveling through the area regulary it is like the best place due to lack of rocks, water depth and lack of really swift water.
confused (I hope this isn't a stupid question)

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#7613 - 01/13/06 07:49 AM Re: Bodygrip triggers in swift water.
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3653
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
The short answer is yes.Pay attention to the "hook" where the dog and frame make contact.A 1/4" round file is best for this work.Tuneing the triggers on bodygrip traps is often overlooked and a cause of much frustration

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#7614 - 01/13/06 11:15 AM Re: Bodygrip triggers in swift water.
45/70 Offline
Member

Registered: 04/10/01
Posts: 832
Loc: South Georgia, usA
Well, I started to post on this question, but somehow lost the post. So if ya'll see a partly completed pos,t it was me -- Woops... ,

I do not know what set with a body gripper you are having this problem with, nor do I know the laws regarding body grippers you have to work within. Certainly adjusting the trap as noted in the archives may help. So my answer may not be of help to you. I hope that it is.

When I make a body gripper set partly submerged in flowing water I make a single pole set. One of the reasons I use this technique is that it is less likely to accumulate debris and flotsam around the triggers, which increases resistence to the current, and results in false fires.

A single pole set is constructed by bending both the springs back in the direction of the dogged jaw when the trap is set. A single pole is driven down through the two eyes, and into the bottom. The dogged jaw should be the closest to the single pole. Both the dogged jaw and the free jaw will be 90 to the surface of the water. Once the trap is stabilized, slide the complete firing mechanism up above the water surface. The trigger wires should be parallel to one another, parallel to the surface of the water, and high enough that they will not be engaged by the critter until he is well into the trap.

The "high & dry" trigger wires, being above the surface of the water are not subjected to the pressures of the flow, and do not collect debris.

If the trap does not adequatey stabilize with only the single pole, it may be stabilized using
other methods. For instance, a stick may be run diagonally between either of the outside corners of the trap; or push a stick straight down under the trap, and squeeze the lower springs around it.

Another advantage to the single pole set is that it fires from side-to-side. The usual jaw motion of a body gripper can knock a swimming animal up and out. Not so when the trap fires side to side -- it is deadly.
Adios,
45/70,
RKBA !!!

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#7615 - 01/14/06 11:21 AM Re: Bodygrip triggers in swift water.
Otterwater0566 Offline
Member

Registered: 02/01/04
Posts: 440
Loc: Austin, AR
Bend the trigger wires with a curve in them with the current. This will help leaves slip off and reduce resistance. Set closest notch to increase trigger presure. Wire and twist tight with pliers to a single pole as described above, (this is also one of my most often used deep water setting methods for den enbtrances and channels) don't forget to wire trap, not just stick to tree or stake. I don't recommend filing dog notches for bodygrips for the beginner, (can be dangerous-JMO). Remove any lose debris that may be floating just upstream from your trap and walk and kick around a bit before setting the trap to let this go on down the creek.

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#7616 - 01/14/06 12:24 PM Re: Bodygrip triggers in swift water.
Dktfireman Offline
Member+

Registered: 07/13/05
Posts: 338
Loc: New Hampshire
Thanks for all the advise. I did modify a couple of my 330's. They fire pretty darn quick now. LOL
I turned the bad one over and did 45-70's trick. I bent the bottom trigger wire down so there is only one wire in the water. Tommorrow I will bend the trigger wires back on all of my traps to keep from having to clean them off every day, thats a good idea laugh I'm learning so much I can't believe my brain hasn't gone into vapor lock yet! cool I'm having so much fun even the weather can't get me down! wink
Thanks again everyone!

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#7617 - 01/14/06 06:42 PM Re: Bodygrip triggers in swift water.
45/70 Offline
Member

Registered: 04/10/01
Posts: 832
Loc: South Georgia, usA
There are times I describe things poorly, and then there are times I describe things more poorly!
Dktfireman, don't turn the trap over, i.e. bottom to top (or 180) ("upside down"). For a single pole set, the trap is 90 to what most folks think is normal setting. Don't bend the trigger wires, except to make them parallel. Then slide them up above the water, high enough so that they will not collect floatsam. They need to be in a position to fire when the animal is fully commited to the trap.
Hope this is helpful to you.
Adios,
45.70,
RKBA !!!

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#7618 - 01/14/06 09:15 PM Re: Bodygrip triggers in swift water.
Dktfireman Offline
Member+

Registered: 07/13/05
Posts: 338
Loc: New Hampshire
LOL laugh I understood what you wrote and that is how I set the trap. I was afraid that an otter going through a 330 with the triggers completly out of the water he might make it without setting the trap off? (what do you think?) Only about 3" of the trap is above the water, thats why I bent the lower trigger wire down. I figured that the current wouldn't bother just the one wire and a critter going through would. I liked setting the trap that way, it wasn't too hard to stabilize. Thanks again! smile

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#7619 - 01/14/06 09:39 PM Re: Bodygrip triggers in swift water.
RiverOtter Offline
Member

Registered: 02/27/05
Posts: 646
Loc: Monashee Mtns, British Columbi...
With the triggers above the water, an otter will fire a 330 just fine. When he goes through the trap, he will either hit the trigger wires with his nose or if he ducks he will hit them with the top of his shoulders as his back humps up to dive under the wires. Picked up two otters today with that exact set-up with 330's set in holes punched in a beaver dam.

RO smile

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#25360 - 10/17/17 12:21 PM Re: Bodygrip triggers in swift water. [Re: Dktfireman]
Archive Offline


Registered: 03/12/03
Posts: 1116
Dated for search.

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