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#7738 - 07/28/06 10:58 AM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
Bogmaster Offline
Member

Registered: 07/31/00
Posts: 240
Loc: Lakeland,Mn.
The amount of weight needed at the end of a drowner,is dependent on the consistancy of the bottom. A hard bottom requires more weight,than a soft muddy bottom.
I agree with Ric about minimum weight amounts for beaver.On a hard flat bottom, a big beaver can pull 80 pounds with relative ease.Everything is lighter,once in the H2O.
I try to stake both ends of my sliders.
Just another one of the reasons,I have retired the footholds for beaver--no screwing around with drowning rigs.
Tom Olson

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#7739 - 07/28/06 12:25 PM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
Hal Offline
Moderator

Registered: 07/17/00
Posts: 9874
Loc: Blue Creek, Ohio, USA
Musher: You must have metric dirt. smile

Most people don’t realize how big a cubic foot is. A plastic “milk crate” is a little shy of a cubic foot. Fill one completely full of dirt one time and pick it up.

We all know that water is “a pint a pound” or 8 pounds to the gallon. A cubic foot of water is 7.5 gallons. So a cubic foot of water weighs about 60 pounds, not surprising then that a cubic foot of dry dirt weighs 75 lbs.

That “dry” part is important too. Nobody ever talks about the buoyancy factor. Everything you throw in the water wants to float -- even a rock. The weight of the object is lessened by the amount of water it displaces. Let’s say you took that dry dirt, packaged it very tightly in a plastic bag (removing all the air), and threw it in the water. That 75 lb chunk of dirt, will displace 7.5 gallons of water (60 lbs). It really only weighs 15 pounds, underwater.

However, most any trapper using dirt for an anchor is going to be using wet or damp earth to fill the bag. This is much heavier than dry dirt. Of course things like rocks and steel are even more dense (displace less water) than dirt.

smile -- Hal
_________________________
Endeavor to persevere.

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#7740 - 07/28/06 02:30 PM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
musher Online   content


Registered: 07/22/03
Posts: 1954
Loc: Qc.
Hal: 25 litres of soil is .9 of a cubic foot. I bought several bags of the stuff. The composted soil inside is VERY wet. There's no way it weighs 75 pounds. If it does, the woman at Canadian Tire that helped me throw them in the truck is sturdier than she looks. I say that it's maybe 30 pounds.

I'm guessing that my "dirt" is different. For example, 25 litres of sand would have a greater mass. smile

BTW: I wonder if our milkcrates are the same. We buy milk in bags. There are 3 bags per package for a total of 4 litres (about 3 quarts).Our quarts were 40 ounces. I believe that yours are 32 ounces. Ounces are the same at 28 grams. However Troy ounces, as in gold, are 20 grams ... laugh

Canada going metric was one of the silliest things ever. You guys were supposed to follow suit. :rolleyes:

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#7741 - 07/28/06 02:51 PM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3642
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
river sand is 120lb per cubic foot.Musher the dirt you purchased more that likely has a high amount of orgain material in it.The weights I gave come from a riggers manual it is refering to the kind of dirt you would find on a construction site.When I said 40 lb. for beaver that is what I want the dirt to weigh.I figure that the weight of the water in the dirt is cancled out by the dirt itself being in the water.Dirt being heavyer than water I have + net weight even after displacement is taken into consideration.That is what keeps the critter where it supposed to be

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#7742 - 07/29/06 10:00 PM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1897
Loc: WV
Like most people, I'll toss my drowning anchor into the deepest water avilable. What is the recommended depth of water for a drowning set for coon, and for beaver? smile

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#7743 - 07/30/06 02:21 AM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
Bogmaster Offline
Member

Registered: 07/31/00
Posts: 240
Loc: Lakeland,Mn.
A hind foot caught beaver,needs a minimum of 4 feet of water to drown.
I like at least 2 feet of water, for a front foot caught coon.(this is using a short chained trap,I have the chain,just long enough to set easily in front of my pockets).Those that do not shorten their chains,will need more water for dispatch.
Tom Olson

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#7744 - 07/30/06 07:00 AM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
Mike Marchewka Offline
Member

Registered: 01/31/02
Posts: 152
Loc: Crystal Lake,Illinois
Like Tom said....but let me add to that a short chained HEAVY trap is better BEAVER medicine.
Take a smaller jaw, stock trap that have some beaver trappers been advocating recently...not here by the way...like the #2 Bridger. Using Tom's info a beaver could bob up and down if back foot/toe caught even if on a short chain. A heavier trap on a short chain like a CDR 7.5, MB750 or #5 Bridger/Duke will cause the beaver to tire quicker...not always mind you but a higher percentage of the time.
Just another reason IF you are beaver trapping use the proper sized trap....you'll have fewer problems.
Now as far as deep water goes...my opinion now...for beaver trapping butt deep or deeper. I tried the below the knee method and I ran into problems. I now go with the butt deep method...I realize its only a few more inches but I want evey advantage to catch that beaver the FIRST time.
Coon trapping...knee height works for me. Let me add here ...some very good coon trappers have been using larger jaw spread traps when drowning coon. More versatility out their traps plus more weight on the animal....hope this helps.

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#7745 - 07/30/06 09:16 AM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
Ric Offline


Registered: 07/22/00
Posts: 3642
Loc: Wellington,OH=USA
Butt deep on who? In my case most respectable beaver would be able to walk.I'll refer those interested back to Bogmaster

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#7746 - 08/02/06 09:33 AM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
redsnow Online   content
Moderator

Registered: 06/11/06
Posts: 1897
Loc: WV
I estimated 4 to 4.5 feet of water for a postive drowning set for beaver. I figured 40" from a (big) beavers nose to it's back toes. And, another 12" for the trap and chain. I usually wade out knee-deep, and toss the anchor as far as I can. Thinking about my beaver from last winter, some of them were in 8 feet of water.

I've followed this thread from day one. We've had comments from around the country and Canada, by some good trappers. One thing that surprised me is the # of trappers using "drowning rods". Here in my section of WV, our rivers and streams have rock bottoms. It would be nearly impossible to stake the deep end of a cable or use drowning rods. They would work in some of the "flood-control" dams that I've trapped. All good info to know.

I've been thinking about Hal's adjustable drowning-rigs, and the best thing I've came up with so far, is to use an L-type lock (back-wards) for the adjustment. I can see where a snare lock would work also. smile

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#7747 - 08/03/06 08:09 AM Re: Drowning set/Slide-Wire, Question???
jwr Offline
Member

Registered: 02/19/03
Posts: 199
Loc: ark
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I usually t-bar my deep water anchor. But have used two cinder blocks attached or 2-3 railroad tie plates attached...IN DEEP WATER.

For those of you that use this system, weld a leg on the top of your lock. Mine look lie a C.

MOST of the time I can hook the leg with my walking stick (kinda like a leggets tool and a must if water trapping for me) and not have to wade out and pull the stake.

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